Tag: development enviroment

Python Documentation with Sphinx

I’ve been working on a proof of concept project at work, and the time has come to convert it into a production system. One of the things it was lacking was documentation, principally for the developers who would continue work on it. For software projects there is a solution to this type of problem: automated documentation systems which take the structure of the code and the comments in it (written in a particular way) and generate human readable documentation from it – typically in the form of webpages.

For Python the “go to” tool in this domain is Sphinx.

I used Sphinx a few years ago, and although I got to where I wanted in terms of the documentation it felt like a painful process. This time around I progressed much more quickly and was happier with the results. This blog post is an attempt to summarise what I did for the benefit of others (including future me). Slightly perversely, although I use a Windows 10 laptop, I use Git Bash as my command prompt but I believe everything here will apply regardless of environment.

There are any number of Sphinx guides and tutorials around, I used this one by Sam Nicholls as a basis supplemented with a lot of Googling for answers to more esoteric questions. My aim here is to introduce some pragmatic solutions to features I wanted, and to clarify some thing that might seem odd if you are holding the wrong concept of how Sphinx works in your head.

I was working on a pre-existing project. To make all of the following work I ran “pip install …” for the following libraries: sphinx, sphinx-rtd-theme, sphinx-autodoc-typehints, and m2r2. In real life these additional libraries were added progressively. sphinx-rtd-theme gives me the the popular “Readthedocs” theme, Readthedocs is a site that publishes documentation and the linked example shows what can be achieved with Sphinx. sphinx-autodoc-typehints pulls in type-hints from the code (I talked about these in another blog post) and m2r2 allows the import of Markdown (md) format files, Sphinx uses reStructuredText (rst) format by default. These are both simple formats that are designed to translate easily into HTML format which is a pain to edit manually.

With these preliminaries done the next step is to create a “docs” subdirectory in the top level of your repository and run the “sphinx-quickstart” script from the commandline. This will ask you a bunch of questions, you can usually accept the default or provide an obvious answer. The only exception to this, to my mind, is when asked “Separate source and build directories“, you should answer “yes“. When this process finishes sphinx-quickstart will have generated a couple of directories beneath “docs“: “source” and “build“. The build directory is empty, the source directory contains a conf.py file which contains all the configuration information you just provided, an index.rst file and a Makefile. I show the full directory structure of the repository further down this post.

I made minor changes to conf.py, switching the theme with html_theme = ‘sphinx_rtd_theme’, and adding the extensions I’m using:

extensions = [
'sphinx.ext.autodoc',
'sphinx_autodoc_typehints',
'm2r2',
]

I uncommented the following lines:

import os 
import sys
sys.path.insert(0, os.path.abspath('..'))

This allows the Sphinx to “see” the rest of your repository from the docs directory.

The documentation can now be built using the “make html” command but it will be a bit dull.

In order to generate the documentation from code a command like: “sphinx-apidoc -o source/ ../project_code“, run from the docs directory will generate .rst files in the source directory which reflect the code you have. To do this Sphinx imports your code, and it will use the presence of the __init__.py file to discover which directories to import. It is happy to import subdirectories of the main module as submodules. These will go into files of the form module.submodule.rst.

The rst files contain information from the docstrings in your code files, (those comments enclosed in triple double-quotes “””I’m a docstring”””. A module or submodule will get the comments from the __init__.py file as an overview then for each code file the comments at the top of the file are included. Finally, each function gets an entry based on its definition and some specially formatted documentation comments. If you use type-hinting, the sphinx-autodoc-typehints library will include that information in documentation. The following fragment shows most of the different types of annotation I am using in docstrings.

def initialise_logger(output_file:Union[str, bytes, os.PathLike], mode:Optional[str]="both")->None:
    """
    Setup logging to console and file simultanenously. The process is described here:
    Logging to Console and File In Python

    :param output_file: log file to use. Frequently we set this to:
    .. highlight:: python
    .. code-block:: python

            logname = __file__.replace("./", "").replace(".py", "")
            os.path.join("logs", "{}.log".format(logname)) 
        
    :param mode: `both` or `file only` selects whether output is sent to file and console, or file only
    
    :return: No return value
    """

My main complaint regarding the formatting of these docstrings is that reStructuredText (and I suspect all flavours of Markdown) are very sensitive to whitespace in a manner I don’t really understand. Sphinx can support other flavours of docstring but I quite like this default. The docstring above, when it is rendered, looks like this:

In common with many developers my first level of documentation is a set of markdown files in the top level of my repository. It is possible to include these into the Sphinx documentation with a little work. The two issues that need to be addressed is that commonly such files are written in Markdown rather reStructuredText. These can be fixed by using the m2r2 library. Secondly the top level of a repository is outside the Sphinx source tree, so you need to put rst files in the source directory which include the Markdown files from the root of the repository. For the CONTRIBUTIONS.md file the contributions.rst file looks like this:

.. mdinclude:: ../../CONTRIBUTIONS.md

Putting this all together the (edited) structure for my project looks like the following, I’ve included the top-level of the repository which contains the Markdown flavour files, the docs directory, where all the Sphinx material lives, and stubs to the directories containing the module code, with __init__.py files.

.

├── CONTRIBUTIONS.md
├── INSTALLATION.md
├── OVERVIEW.md
├── USAGE.md
├── andromeda_dq
│   ├── __init__.py
│   ├── scripts
│   │   ├── __init__.py
│   ├── tests
│   │   ├── __init__.py
├── docs
│   ├── Makefile
│   ├── make.bat
│   └── source
│       ├── _static
│       ├── _templates
│       ├── andromeda_dq.rst
│       ├── andromeda_dq.scripts.rst
│       ├── andromeda_dq.tests.rst
│       ├── conf.py
│       ├── contributions.rst
│       ├── index.rst
│       ├── installation.rst
│       ├── modules.rst
│       ├── overview.rst
│       └── usage.rst
├── setup.py

The index.rst file pulls together documentation in other rst files, these are referenced by their name excluded the rst extension (so myproject pulls in a link to myproject.rst). By default the index file does not pull in all of the rst files generated by apidoc, so these might need to be added. The index.rst file for my project looks like this, all I have done manually to this file is add in overview, installation, usage, contributions and modules in the “toctree” section.

.. Andromeda Data Quality documentation master file, created by
   sphinx-quickstart on Wed Sep 15 08:33:59 2021.
   You can adapt this file completely to your liking, but it should at least
   contain the root `toctree` directive.

Andromeda Data Quality
======================

Documentation built using Sphinx. To re-build run `make html` in the `docs`
directory of the project.

The OVERVIEW.md, INSTALLATION.md, USAGE.md, and CONTRIBUTIONS.md files are imported 
from the top level of the repo.

Most documentation is from type-hinting and docstrings in source files.

.. toctree::
   :maxdepth: 3
   :caption: Contents:

   overview
   installation
   usage
   contributions
   modules
   


Indices and tables
==================

* :ref:`genindex`
* :ref:`modindex`
* :ref:`search`

The (edited) HTML index page for the documentation looks like this:

For some reason Sphinx puts the text in the __init__.py files which it describes as “Module Contents” at the bottom of the relevant package description, this can be fixed by manually moving the “Module contents” section to the top of the file in the relevant package rst file.

There is a little bit of support for Sphinx in Visual Code, I’ve installed the reStructuredText Syntax highlighting extension and the Python Sphinx Highlighter extension. The one thing I haven’t managed to do is automate the process of running “make html” either on commit of new code, or when code is pushed to a remote. I suspect this will be one of the drawbacks in using Sphinx. I’m getting a bit better at adding type-hinting and docstrings as I code now.

If you have any comments, or suggestions, or find any errors in this blog post feel free to contact me on twitter (@ianhopkinson_).

A Docker environment for Windows (October 2015 edition)

This blog post provides an outline method for installing a nice environment for developing in Python using Docker on a Windows 10 machine. Hopefully I have provided sufficient of the error messages I encountered that both myself and others will find this post when in distress!

The past three years I’ve been working for ScraperWiki as a data scientist, this has meant a degree of coding in Python and interacting with my colleagues, and some customers, who use Linux (principally Ubuntu) or OS X. I have continued to use a Windows laptop. You can see my review of it here.

Until recently my setup was based on a core installation of Python and a whole bunch of handy libraries using Python(x,y). I also installed Git for Windows which gave me a shell prompt, and the command-line git commands along with some fraction of the bash environment. I also installed msysgit which provided further Linux style enhancements to my shell. I configured my shell so I could get ssh access to ScraperWiki servers in the cloud. For reasons I can’t recall I also installed ansicon.exe which gives the Windows Command prompt some of the colour highlighting of a modern shell prompt.

With this setup I could do most of what I needed from Windows, and if I had to I could fire up my Ubuntu VM and work in there. Typically I did this when I had some tricky libraries to install, or I wanted to be sure I could deploy onto ScraperWiki’s servers in the cloud. I never really got virtual environments working nicely on Windows – virtualenvwrapper, which makes such things, nicer is challenging to configure on Windows.

Students of this sort of thing will appreciate that the configuration described above is reached with a degree of trial and error, and a lot of Googling of error messages.

Times have changed and this setup was getting a bit long in the tooth, the environment around me was also changing – we started using Docker. I couldn’t get code using the Python requests library to run because of problems with SSL. Also, all the cool kids were talking about Python 3 and how new projects should all be in Python 3. I couldn’t work out how to add Python 3 to my Python(x,y) installation, and furthermore I was currently tied to 32-bit rather than 64-bit Python. ScraperWiki had recently done some work on making an easily deployable Python application and identified that the Anaconda Python distribution by ContinuumIO was the way to go.

Installing Python 3 and 2 using Anaconda

This worked very smoothly, there is an installer here. I had Python 3.4.3 (64-bit) working in the twinkling of an eye, and from my bash prompt I could now run that Python code which was previously broken due to OpenSSL problems. However, all was not rosy since it turns out my latest project was accidently Python 3 compatible, whilst my older projects were not. I therefore needed Python 2 as well. In principle, with Anaconda this is as simple as doing:

conda create -n python2 python=2.7 anaconda

and then

source activate python2

This puts you into a Python 2 virtual environment which will run your old code. However, it doesn’t work from the Git Bash prompt, you need to use a Windows Command prompt, as discussed here. But at least I now have the latest whizzy Python 3 installation and I can also run Python 2, when required. It’s worth noting that installing new libraries on Python under Windows has become rather easier with newer versions of pip, I believe due to the introduction of pip wheel. In the past installing some libraries was a pain because of a need to compile binary components.

Using Docker on Windows with Docker Toolbox and the Git SDK

The next task was to get support for Docker, the container system. You can find out more about Docker in my blog post here. Essentially it is a method for running an application in an isolation unit which is defined by a simple Dockerfile, largely removing problems of dependencies and versions. Docker is intrinsically a Linux technology, it relies on several deeply embedded components of the operating system and so does not run on Windows. However, you can boot up a very lightweight Linux-based VM and run Docker images on that from either Windows or OS X. Until recently this was done using boot2docker. The new way is to use the Docker Toolbox. I held off installing this until it became Windows 10 compatible since as a neophile I have obviously upgraded to Windows 10 at earliest opportunity. Docker Toolbox installs VirtualBox to run a VM to host Docker and Git for Windows to provide a bash shell prompt, as well as the Docker commandline tools.

I found installing Docker Toolbox relatively smooth although I had a problem with it finding ssh key files with an error message “open <filepath\ca.pem : The system cannot find the file specified” which was fixed by regenerating the key files:

docker-machine regenerate-certs default

But this alone does not give me the right workflow since ScraperWiki make heavy use of Make to build and run containers and Git for Windows does not come configured with Make. You can see this in action for the Simple API we made for the NewsReader Project. I used the Git for Windows SDK to provide Make and other build tools. This is designed for use by Git for Windows developers, it’s based on msys2 which I also tried to install but which errored on a couple of steps. The Git SDK is more verbose in its installation appeared to install cleanly.

Once we have Git for Windows SDK we need to use its git-bash to launch Docker Quickstart Terminal (rather than the version provided by the Toolbox), this means changing the command executed by the Docker Quickstart Terminal shortcut from:

"C:\Program Files\Git\git-bash.exe" "C:\Program Files\Docker Toolbox\start.sh"

to

C:\git-sdk-64\git-bash.exe "C:\Program Files\Docker Toolbox\start.sh"

Update 2016-03-21: I modified start.sh to give the docker-machine binary an absolute path, this means I can launch a plain Git Bash shell and run the start.sh script later, if required. This change requires further modification to make sure paths were properly escaped. You can see my version of start.sh here: https://gist.github.com/IanHopkinson/85453a90212eb6627f29

Simply trying to run the Git SDK version of the make tool does not seem to work, you get an error like “unable to make temporary trusted Dockerfile”.

We’re into the final straight now!

My final problem was that when I tried to make my previously working application it failed with an error message:

IOError: [Errno 2] No usable temporary directory found in ['/tmp', '/var/tmp', '/usr/tmp', '/home/newsreader-demo']

The problem seems to be the way in which msys2 handles paths in Windows it needs to have two preceding //, rather than one, as described here. So all I need to do is change this line in my Makefile

@docker run -p 8000:8000 --read-only --rm --volume /tmp -e NEWSREADER_PUBLIC_API_KEY ianhopkinson/newsreader_demo

To this:

@docker run -p 8000:8000 --read-only --rm --volume //tmp -e NEWSREADER_PUBLIC_API_KEY ianhopkinson/newsreader_demo

Can you see what I did there?

Update 2015-10-14 – interactive shells into docker

If you try to get an interactive shell on a container then you get an error like:

cannot enable tty mode on non tty input

To avoid this you can use winpty:

winpty docker exec -i -t [CONTAINER_NAME] bash

There’s some discussion of this on the Docker Toolbox issue tracker

Update 2015-10-22 – Which Python are you using?

It turns out I was accidentally using the Python shipped with Git for Windows SDK, rather than the Anaconda version I had so carefully installed. I fixed this by adding this to my .profile file:

export PATH=/c/anaconda3/:$PATH

I didn’t spot it earlier because I checked Python version by running ipython rather than python.

Concluding thoughts

I wrote this partly in frustration at the amount of time I spent getting this all fixed up, and the fact that I couldn’t stop until I had fixed it. The scheme above worked for me but I suspect it is quicker and easier to do on a laptop with no history.

There’s no doubt that the situation is better than I found it 3 years ago but it is still a painful process involving much trial and error. Docker brings great benefits for developers, and once it is working makes sharing your work across multiple users very straightforward.