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Jul 07 2020

Type annotations in Python, an adventure with Visual Studio Code and Pylance

I’ve been a Python programmer pretty much full time for the last 7 or 8 years, so I keep an eye out for new tools to help me with this. I’ve been using Visual Studio Code for a while now, and I really like it. Microsoft have just announced Pylance, the new language server for Python in Visual Studio Code.

The language server provides language-sensitive help like spotting syntax errors, providing function definitions and so forth. Pylance is based on the type checking engine Pyright. Python is a dynamically typed language but recently has started to support type annotations. Dynamic typing means you don’t tell the interpreter what “type” a variable is (int, string and so forth) you just use it as such. This contrasts with statically typed languages where for every variable and function you define a type as you write your code. Type annotations are a halfway house, they are not used by the Python interpreter but they can be used by tools like Pylance to check code, making it more likely to run correctly on first go.

Pylance provides a range of “Intellisense” code improvement features, as well as type annotation based checks (which can be switched off).

I was interested to use the type annotations checking functionality since one of the pleasures of working with statically typed languages is that once you’ve satisfied your compiler that all of the types are right then it has a better chance of running correctly than a program in a dynamically typed language.

I will use the write_dictionary function in my little ihutilities library as an example here, this function is defined in the file io_utils.py. The appropriate type annotation for write_dictionary is:

def write_dictionary(filename: str, data: List[Dict[str,Any]], 
append:Optional[bool]=True, delimiter:Optional[str]=",") -> None:

Essentially each variable is followed by a colon, and then a type (i.e str). Certain types are imported from the typing library (Any, List, Optional and Dict in this instance). We supply the types of the elements of the list, or dictionary. The Any type allows for any type. The Optional keyword is used for optional parameters which can have a default value. The return type is put at the end after the ->. In a *.pyi file described below, the function body is replaced with ellipsis (…).

Actually the filename type hint shouldn’t be string but I can’t get the approved type of Union[str, bytes, os.PathLike] to work with Pylance at the moment.

As an aside Pylance spotted that two imports in the io_utils.py library were unused. Once I’d applied the type annotation to the function definition it inferred the types of variables in the code, and highlighted where there might be issues. A recurring theme was that I often returned a string or None from a function, Pylance indicated this would cause a problem if I tried to measure the length of None.

There a number of different ways of providing typing information, depending on your preference and whether you are looking at your own code, or at a 3rd party library:

  1. Types provided at definition in the source module – this is the simplest method, you just replace the function def line in the source module file with the type annotated one;
  2. Types provided in the source module by use of *.pyi files – you can also put the type-annotated function definition in a *.pyi file alongside the original file in the source module in the manner of a C header file. The *.pyi file needs to sit in the same directory as its *.py sibling. This definition takes precedence over a definition in the *.py file. The reason for using this route is that it does not bring incompatible syntax into the *.py files – non-compliant interpreters will simply ignore *.pyi files but it does clutter up your filespace. Also there is a risk of the *.py and *pyi becoming inconsistent;
  3. Stub files added to the destination project – if you import write_dictionary into a project Pylance will highlight that it cannot find a stub file for ihutilities and will offer to create one. This creates a `typings` subdirectory alongside the file on which this fix was executed, this contains a subdirectory called `ihutilities` in which there are files mirroring those in the ihutilities package but with the *.pyi extension i.e. __init__.pyi, io_utils.py, etc which you can modify appropriately;
  4. Types provided by stub-only packages PEP-0561 indicates a fourth route which is to load the type annotations from a separate, stub only, module.
  5. Types provided by Typeshed – Pyright uses Typeshedfor annotations for built-in and standard libraries, as well as some popular third party libraries;

Type annotations were introduced in Python 3.5, in 2015, so are a relatively new language feature. Pyright is a little over a year old, and Pylance is a few days old. Unsurprisingly documentation in this area is relatively undeveloped. I found myself looking at the PEP (Python Enhancement Proposals) references as often as not to understand what was going on. If you want to see a list of relevant PEPs then there is a list on the Pyright README.md, I even added one myself.

Pylance is a definite improvement on the old Python language server which was itself more than adequate. I am currently undecided about type annotations, the combination of Pylance and type annotations caught some problems in my code which would only come to light in certain runtime circumstances. They seem to be a bit of an overhead which I suspect I would only use for frequently used library routines, and core code which gets run a lot and is noticeable by others when it fails. I might start by adding in some *.pyi files to my active projects.

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